Kelly Denton-BorhaugU.S. War-Culture, Sacrifice, and Salvation

Routledge, 2014

by Bob Wintermute on August 19, 2015

Kelly Denton-Borhaug

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More of a conversation than an interview, Kelly Denton-Borhaug shares the insights and processes underpinning her book U.S. War-Culture, Sacrifice and Salvation (Routledge, 2014). Denton-Borhaug considers how sacrificial rhetoric has suffused American perceptions of conflict and our military institutions, creating a cultural dynamic that has come to accept war as a normative state in keeping with our notions of an exceptionalist identity. Drawing on Denton-Borhaug's training as a religions scholar, U.S. War-Culture, Sacrifice and Salvation takes a different, more philosophical and theological based, approach to issues of concern to students of military history. Her book, and our discussion, is a departure from the usual New Books in Military History fare, but we hope our listeners will find her comments provocative and insightful; a true representation of the potentials for our field in inter-disciplinary study.

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